Natural History Society of Maryland
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Natural History Society of Maryland

Events

Upcoming events

    • 18 Jun 2022
    • 22 Oct 2022
    • 4 sessions
    • 6908 Bel Air Rd, Natural History Society of MD
    Register

    Q. What’s the Overlea Farmer’s Market have that no other farmers market has?

    A. A Natural History Museum.

    The Natural History Society of Maryland has hosted the Overlea Farmer’s Market in its parking lot for the past three years. This year, on select Market Days, the Museum will be open to the public. After you have filled your bellies, come inside and fill your minds. There are animals, fossils, plants, rocks, archaeological artifacts and more waiting for you. Complete the scavenger hunt, and win a prize. The gift store features a suite of items you can’t find anywhere else like a fossil hunt in a bag. Or pick up a pair of shark toothed cufflinks for that special someone.

    • 01 Jul 2022
    • 9:35 AM
    • 30 Sep 2022
    • 11:55 PM
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    This year we are literally scavenging for scavengers in the 2022 NHSM Photo Safari!

    Scavengers and decomposers play an important role in the health, vitality, and function of ecosystems. Just imagine a world without them – piles of rotting bodies, bones, poop, leaves, and wood. Scavengers and decomposers help to recycle nutrients through ecosystems. As a refresher, scavengers consume dead plants and animals (carrion). Decomposers or saprotrophs break down organic material into component nutrients that are easily recycled.

    Some animals are obligate scavengers, meaning that the entirety of the diet is dead plants and animals. Perhaps, the most iconic obligate scavenger is the vulture. Some animals partake in carrion when it is available. These are opportunistic scavengers. Most water turtles fall into this category. For the purposes of this hunt, we are including in the mix obligate and opportunistic scavengers. While some argue that fungi are natural scavengers, the consensus is that they function as decomposers along with bacteria and earthworms. Yep, earthworms are considered decomposers, not scavengers. While most of the scavengers take care of the dead animal matter, fungi break down plant material like lignin and cellulose. They also break down surface waste and release nitrogen back into the soil, crucial for plant growth.

    We utilize the honor system for this Scavenger Hunt. The Spreadsheet, which will be emailed to you along with additional information, has fields for you to record date, time, location and notes for each scavenger/decomposer. We encourage you to record your sightings in photos. A special iNaturalist project has been set up to serve as a clearinghouse for all observations. You will receive access information when you sign up.

    Compete on your own or in a team of up to five friends/family members.

    • 17 Aug 2022
    • 7:00 PM - 8:00 PM
    • Online via Zoom
    Register

    Since 1930 when Richard Stearns became the Curator of Archaeology at NHSM, the Society has had a dedicated interest in archaeology. The archaeology collections are unique in that they do not quite fit the bill for a “Natural History” society. They consist of cultural materials, used by indigenous peoples of many different geographic locations, including most of Maryland as well as Arkansas, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, Ohio, Virginia and numerous other locations. Starting in the fall of 2021, student interns from Towson University began the long process of rehousing and cataloging these collections. In the process, we learned more about the state of archaeology in Maryland and around the country.

    Dr. Katherine Sterner, NHSM Curator and Head of Collections,  is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Towson University. She received her Ph.D. from University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and spent several years as a principal investigator for UW-Milwaukee Cultural Resource Management before joining the faculty at Towson University. Dr. Sterner studies stone tool production and use, communities of practice, and the transition from hunting and gathering to agriculture in the Eastern Woodlands of North America. She teaches courses on Paleoanthropology, Archaeological Methods and Theory, GIS in Anthropology, Experimental Archaeology, Geoarchaeology, and an Archaeological Field School. Dr. Sterner is also the Collections Manager and a member of the Board of Trustees for the Natural History Society of Maryland.

    THIS MEETING IS ONLINE ONLY 

    Natural History Society of Maryland’s Archaeology Club promotes the value of archaeology in Baltimore City, Baltimore County, and surrounding areas. The goal of the Archaeology Club is to educate citizenry in the ethics, methods, and artifact preservation methods of archaeology and how archaeology can be used to document, discover, and promote local history. The Archaeology Club is inclusive to all persons who have an interest in archaeology.

    Normally, Club meetings, trips and other activities are open solely to Club Members. However, during COVID, NHSM is opening up this meeting to all, though we are asking for a $5 donation from non-members. If you are an archaeology enthusiast, please consider joining us. You must be a member of NHSM to join any of its clubs. Follow this link to learn more: https://www.marylandnature.org/club-membership/

    The Natural History Society of Maryland is a volunteer-led non-profit organization, so the fee you pay will go directly to support the programs, the nature collections, and the building that make this kind of nature education possible.

    • 18 Aug 2022
    • 7:00 PM - 8:00 PM
    • Online via Zoom
    Register

    Maryland is often called the “United States in miniature” and we have a variety of catfish species that demonstrates this as well.  We will look at the various habitats that these versatile fish prefer (native and introduced), the problems that can result from stocking nonnative fish and the challenges that managers face when dealing with a species that is both loved and reviled.  Presented by Mary Groves, Fisheries Biologist with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, Fishing and Boating Services.

    • 20 Aug 2022
    • 11:00 AM - 1:00 PM
    • Will be given to participants the day before.
    • 22
    Register

    Owing to the overwhelming evidence that some nonnative species can wreak havoc on native ecosystems, it’s not surprising that conservationists often follow an inflexible dichotomy: native equals good and nonnative equals bad. However, there are other theories and opinions that argue some nonnatives provide beneficial ecological functions that should not be ignored especially in our human altered natural world.

    Donna Thompson in Harford County counts herself among this group. She is on a mission to help the monarchs. Starting with the traditional suite of host plants, Donna’s efforts were yielding minimal results. However, when she planted the milkweed native to New Zealand, which is an annual species in Maryland, the monarchs couldn’t get enough. Let’s not forget that the honeybee is not native to North America, or black-eyed Susans native to Maryland, though they are the state flower.

    This tour is open to NHSM Lep Club members in good standing. Spaces are limited. This is a tour on private property. We ask that whether you agree or disagree with the gardening practices, that you are respectful and kind.

    In a paper published in Conservation Biology, Scientists argue for recognizing the ecological value of some introduced species. “We predict the proportion of non-native species that are viewed as benign or even desirable will slowly increase over time,” they write. They stress that they are not calling for every introduced species to be protected, or even tolerated. Instead, they hope the conservation community will at least consider the possibility that introduced species can do some good.

    Many people disagree. And that is OK; So, let’s discuss and learn more. See the excerpt from an article in Nature below.

    NOTE: Donna is aware that there are studies suggesting that the tropical milkweed with “harbors OE spores.”  This is from Florida where the plants live through the winter. In northern states, these plants are annuals.  They die off over the winter and we start fresh in the spring. The other theory is Monarchs delaying migration because the plants are so healthy it encourages the monarchs to hang around.  The answer is to simply pull the plants out in September so they will be on their way.

    NHSM is not taking a position one way or the other – only providing information.

    Conceptualizing and Evaluating Non-Native Species

    Non-natives can be beneficial by, for example, providing habitat for endangered native species (Schlaepfer et al. 2010). One commentator has argued, “It’s hard to imagine a New England roadside without its tawny day lilies and Queen Anne’s lace, yet both these species are aliens marked for elimination. . . Could it be these plants have actually improved the New England landscape, adding to its diversity and beauty?” (Pollan 1994). We should also note the vast benefits to humans of the imported, non-native species used in agriculture. Moreover, identifying non-natives with damaging invasives ignores that native species can also be damaging and invasive. For example, the native Mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) “is currently suspected to be killing more trees than any other [insect] in North America” (Davis et al. 2011). While it is true that we know what to expect with native species in their native habitat and do not know what to expect with alien species in new habitats (Gould 1997), the equation of non-native species with damaging invaders is overly simplistic.I suggest we understand native species as species that have significantly adapted in response to resident species and the local abiotic environment. By adapted I do not mean “positively fit in” — aggressively competing is as much adapting as is establishing symbiotic relationships. Natives will have forged ecological links with other natives (via predation, commensalism, and other forms of interaction) and perhaps responded evolutionarily as well.
    • 21 Aug 2022
    • 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
    • Natural History Society of MD
    • 34
    Register

    Author Twig George visits the Natural History Society of Maryland to celebrate Oceans of Possibilities Summer Reading Program. Twig will share the story behind the story of her book – Swimming with Sharks.  Following the talk, kids can build their own shark, adding important anatomical features, to take home.

    Twig grew up in a family of naturalists. Her mom, Jean Craighead George, wrote over 100 books about nature and animals for children. When Twig was growing up, her family raised 173 animals in their house, not in a barn, not in cages (mostly). She would wake up in the morning and a crow might be knocking on the window, and often at night there would be a raccoon in her bed!  Twig has used experiences with animals as a jumping off point for her books – which combine facts about animals in the form of a story. She has written or co-written seven books, several with her mother and brothers including: A Dolphin Named Bob, 1996, HarperCollins; Swimming with Sharks, 1999, HarperCollins; Jellies, the Life of Jellyfish, Millbrook Press, 2000; Seahorses, Millbrook Press, 2003; Pocket Guide to the Outdoors, 2009, PenguinRandomhouse; Ice Whale (completed unfinished manuscript by JCG); Crowbar, the Smartest Bird in the World, (completed unfinished manuscript by JCG) 2021, HarperCollins.

    Copies of Twigs book, Jellies and her new book on Crows will be available for purchase and signing. 

    SWIMMING WITH SHARKS: No TV, no friends, and a grandfather struggling with retirement from marine biology–Sarah’s sure her stay in the Florida Keys will be the most boring summer of her life. That is, until she begins to take notice of the unusual-looking fish that visits her grandparents’ dock every day. When Sarah discovers she’s befriended a baby lemon shark, her fascination with sharks fakes roof. Before long, Sarah and her grandfather are inseparable as they spend hours tracking, observing, and swimming with sharks. The Florida summer heats up quickly with heart-pounding shark encounters and the daring pursuit of two shark-fin poachers. This is a shark-filled summer Sarah and her grandfather won’t soon forget.

    OCEANS OF POSSIBILITIES READING CHALLENGE

    • 22 Aug 2022
    • 9:45 AM - 12:45 PM
    • Hart Miller Island
    • 0
    Join waitlist

    Hart-Miller Island is naturalists playground and an ecological success story. Join us on a guided tour conducted by the Maryland Environmental Services.

    We will meet the crew boat the land base location in Essex.  It’s about a 15 minute boat ride to the island where we take a driving (bus) tour of the facilities and discuss the history and construction of the island, the importance of the Port of Baltimore, and the need for dredging.  A full tour takes about 2 to 3 hours (including boat transportation). We will have lunch on the island – bring your own. Trip runs rain or shine.

    Hart-Miller Island is a 1,100-acre island located in Baltimore County on the Chesapeake Bay near the mouth of Middle River and is a must see for those who want to get away from it all. The island was originally part of a peninsula that extended from Edgemere, Maryland. The two islands, Hart and Miller, were joined by the construction of a dike in 1981, and until 2009, the impoundment was filled with dredge material from Baltimore Harbor, eventually creating Hart-Miller island. In recent years, Hart-Miller Island has become a haven for boaters in the northern Chesapeake Bay, providing the public opportunities to encounter many different species of plants, insects and wildlife along with other fun recreational activities.

    The western shore of the island offers safe mooring, wading and access to a 3,000-foot sandy beach. Hart-Miller Island State Park also includes Hawk Cove and Pleasure Island, which also provide recreational opportunities and camping. The park is well-known for its abundant migrating bird populations.

    Cancelation Policy: NHSM Field Experiences

    Cancelations made 7 or more days in advance of the field experience, will receive a refund (minus a $5 processing fee). Cancelations made within the week of the event will not receive a refund but can be transferred to a friend.

    COVID-19 Policy: The wearing of masks in state facilities is voluntary, but unvaccinated individuals are highly encouraged to wear a mask. If you are
    experiencing any symptoms such as a cough, fever, loss of taste or smell, or shortness of breath, please stay home.

    • 24 Aug 2022
    • 7:00 PM - 8:00 PM
    • 6908 Bel Air Rd, Natural History Society of MD, Online via Zoom
    Register

    There are around 17,500 species of butterflies in the world, 750 species in the United States, and  Maryland plays home to over 150 species of butterflies and skippers. At the August meeting of the NHSM Lep Club, Robert Gardner will help you get a better understanding of the scope and breadth of these winged beauties through his personal collections, tell you where you might find them, and answer questions. As is typical for this time of year, the meeting will include a caterpillar and plant swap. Bring some to share.

    Robert Gardener has  been collecting for a major part of 65 of my 75 years. Robert is retired and a Vietnam Veteran. While serving, Robert collected and sent home moths and butterflies from the front lines. He has also collected in Colorado, extensively in the southwest, mid-Atlantic, north east and extensively in Minnesota and Iowa.  Robert has 2 children and 8 grandchildren and lives with his wife in Whitemarsh.

    NOTE: This meeting will be hybrid meaning you may attend in person at the museum or tune in online via Zoom. Please select your preference when checking out.
    All are welcome. If you love butterflies and moths, consider joining the Lep Club.  The Lep Club, is made up of novice and expert lepidopterists who meet to exchange knowledge and support concerning habitat, threats, food sources, identification, and life cycle of butterflies and moths. Club meetings encourage a sharing of knowledge for the raising and breeding of moths and butterflies through hands-on lessons and guest speakers. Club members are also involved in outreach in the greater Baltimore community through educational programs and service projects. Club meetings feature a guest speaker that share their knowledge on a topic related to moths and butterflies as well as time to distribute caterpillars and eggs.
    To learn more about all NHSM Clubs: https://youtu.be/pIA7naRjXws
    To become a member: https://www.marylandnature.org/club-membership/
    • 25 Aug 2022
    • 7:00 PM - 8:00 PM
    • Online via Zoom
    Register

    Beavers were once a vital part of America’s economy. Their pelts were a common currency in the New World, and the hunt for “brown gold” nearly wiped them out. Beavers are making a comeback, but the dangers are far from behind them. Humans often kill beavers when their damming and tree-chewing behaviors cause problems such as flooding and destroyed vegetation. However, this approach is ineffective because new beavers will soon move into the empty habitat. Lethal trapping, dam destruction, and culvert unclogging are only temporary solutions that, in the long-run, are expensive and unsustainable. Fortunately, there is a better way.
    Alison Zak, the founder and director of the Human-Beaver Coexistence Fund, will help us learn about the North American beaver (Castor canadensis) natural history, behavior, and ecology,  discuss why beavers are so important to the landscape and explore nonlethal strategies that landowners can implement to promote human-beaver coexistence.
    The Human-Beaver Coexistence Fund (https://coexistwithbeavers.org/) is an organization that educates communities on the benefits of beavers and helps landowners address the problems beavers can cause such as tree-chewing and flooding. Alison is also an anthropologist, environmental educator, writer, and yoga teacher. In her life ‘before beavers,’ she studied the conflict between farmers and endangered monkeys in Indonesia.
    Mike Digout is the photographer of the beaver photo.
    • 27 Aug 2022
    • 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM
    • Marshy Point Nature Center
    • 5
    Register

    Join NHSM Herpetology club leader Tom Scollins on a hike through varied habitats at Marshy Point Park in eastern Baltimore County.

    This area has a variety of reptiles and amphibians to observe. Feet may get wet so dress accordingly!

    Bring a packed lunch and enjoy a picnic afterwards!

    Ages: All ages are welcome.

    Accessibility: Walking through marshy (wet) habitat. The trails are relatively flat and easy to navigate.

    What to wear: Dress appropriately for walking outside in the marches in the summer. closed toe shoes are recommended.

    What to bring: Water. Sun and bug protection of choice.

     

    This event is open to NHSM Herp* Club Members only

    *Herpetology is the branch of zoology concerned with reptiles and amphibians.

     

    • 28 Aug 2022
    • 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM
    • 6908 Bel Air Rd, Natural History Society of MD
    • 11
    Register

    When you think scrimshaw, images of whaling ships may come to mind. However, the art of scratching images into materials as art can be traced back throughout human history and prehistory. Nate Salzman, Education and Exhibit Specialist from the Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum will share with us the history of scrimshaw and then we will learn how to take simple materials (bone, and ink), simple tools (sandpaper and scribe) and turn them into something simply stupendous ….. Scrimshaw! No experience is necessary. If you can draw a straight line, you can scrimshaw.

    This session is open to children aged 10-17 (there is an adult session later on the same day). SPACES are limited. At the time of this posting, masks are optional. This protocol may be changed at any time based on evolving public safety. Cancellations prior to one week before the start of the class will incur a $5 processing fee. Within a week, no refunds will be issued.

    The origin of the word “scrimshaw” is somewhat obscure, but most scholars agree that it probably came from an Old Dutch word which means “a waste of time.” A “scrimshander” was someone who never got much done. Today that word is used to identify etching or carving of bone or other natural materials and is recognized as an American folk art.

    The intersection of art and science has been a foundational pillar of NHSM since its founding in 1929

    • 28 Aug 2022
    • 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
    • 6908 Bel Air Rd, Natural History Society of MD
    • 0
    Join waitlist

    When you think scrimshaw, images of whaling ships may come to mind. However, the art of scratching images into materials as art can be traced back throughout human history and prehistory. Nate Salzman, Education and Exhibit Specialist from the Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum will share with us the history of scrimshaw and then we will learn how to take simple materials (bone, and ink), simple tools (sandpaper and scribe) and turn them into something simply stupendous ….. Scrimshaw! No experience is necessary. If you can draw a straight line, you can scrimshaw.

    This session is open to adults (there is a kid’s session earlier on the same day). SPACES are limited. At the time of this posting, masks are optional. This protocol may be changed at any time based on evolving public safety. Cancellations prior to one week before the start of the class will incur a $5 processing fee. Within a week, no refunds will be issued.

    The origin of the word “scrimshaw” is somewhat obscure, but most scholars agree that it probably came from an Old Dutch word which means “a waste of time.” A “scrimshander” was someone who never got much done. Today that word is used to identify etching or carving of bone or other natural materials and is recognized as an American folk art.

    The intersection of art and science has been a foundational pillar of NHSM since its founding in 1929

    • 01 Sep 2022
    • 7:00 PM - 8:00 PM
    • Online via Zoom
    Register

    Found circum-globally in tropical and warm temperate seas, the whale shark (Rhincodon typus) is the largest fish in the sea.  The species has suffered a >50% decline in global population over the last 75 years, leading to a conservation status of “Endangered” on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

    Cameron Perry, PhD candidate at Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, who works closely with Georgia Aquarium on their whale shark research, will discuss all things whale sharks and provide insight into how Georgia Aquarium is helping solve this missing piece in whale shark biology and ecology. Journey with him to the remote island of St Helena as he shares the results of dedicated field research trips to this location.  Come learn more about why whale sharks may be showing up in these waters and how they may help provide clues into the mysteries surrounding whale shark reproduction

    Our limited understanding of whale shark reproduction comes from one pregnant female that was caught in Taiwan in 1995 (Joung et al., 1996). 

    • 07 Sep 2022
    • 7:00 PM - 8:00 PM
    • Natural History Society of MD, Online via Zoom
    Register

    Vertebrates (animals with backbones) evolved in the sea and eventually moved onto land. Early ancestors of the ocean’s biggest animals once walked on land then later returned to the sea, taking advantage of its rich food supplies. Join curious fossil hunter, Tom Piscitelli to learn more about this incredible journey from sea to land and back again through fossil teeth, vertebrae and ear bones. This presentation is offered in person – come and see and touch the fossils and online. 

    Natural History Society of Maryland’s Fossil Club is a group of novice and more experienced collectors will meet to exchange knowledge and help with fossil identification, discuss fossil locations, as well as other fossil related topics. Monthly meetings are held the first Wednesday of every month at the Natural History Society of Maryland. Due to COVID, NHSM is opening up this club meeting to all. Non-members are asked to donate $5. If you are a fossil enthusiast, please consider joining (https://www.marylandnature.org/club-membership/). The Natural History Society of Maryland is a volunteer-led non-profit organization, so the fee you pay will go directly to support the programs, the nature collections, and the building that make this kind of nature education possible
    • 08 Sep 2022
    • 7:00 PM - 8:00 PM
    • Online via Zoom
    Register

    If you think you know sharks, think again. They are multidimensional, varied in size, speed, and habits, and have figured a way to stick around for over 450 million years. Dr. Aaron Carlisle, from the University of Delaware. who will provide an overview on shark evolution, biology, and ecology – highlighting the important role sharks play in the Mid-Atlantic region and the World’s oceans.

    Dr. Aaron Carlisle has a B.A in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology from Princeton University, a M.S in Marine Science from San Jose State University and a Ph.D in Biological Sciences from Stanford University. He currently is an assistant professor at University of Delaware School of Marine Science and Policy. Dr. Carlisle is currently researching the spatial, trophic, and physiological ecology of elasmobranchs (sharks, skates, and rays)  He is a member of an international research marine conservation consortium, as well as the IUCN Shark Specialist Group, which seeks to secure the conservation of the world’s sharks, rays and chimaeras. Over the course of his career, he has also worked as a member of the Pacific Shark Research Center, and alongside the NOAA Environmental Research Division.

    • 10 Sep 2022
    • 08 Oct 2022
    • 5 sessions
    • 6908 Bel Air Rd, Natural History Society of MD
    • 8
    Register

    Our natural world is a fascinating place. Being able to observe and replicate it through illustration provides insights into life that can change how we think about ourselves and our surroundings. This course is suitable for people looking to enter the illustration discipline as a serious pursuit or just looking to explore a passion Instructor Tim Phelps will show you practical ways to develop your skills from the outset covering the fundamentals of Natural History Illustration, from the first observation to final product. Join us to explore, observe and draw the natural world and become part of a scientific tradition steeped in history.

    Students will be introduced to rendering techniques in drawing and sketching in graphite and pen and ink illustration. Specimens from the museum collection will be provided each week for in-house drawing and take-home use. As the class progresses and the student becomes more confident, specimens with more complexity will be encouraged for illustrating during the 5-week session.
    Students will be encouraged to keep a nature journal of quick sketches between weekly class time.

    • In-class critiques each week will allow students to hear comments and get encouragement from both the instructor and their classmates.
    • Examples of both the instructor’s illustrations and those of his students completed in graduate school projects will be shared.
    • Slide presentations will demonstrate principles on light on form, drawing and sketching
      techniques, and finished published works of others professional work.

    The small size and relaxed workshop atmosphere facilitate interactions among the instructor and participants, allowing the instructor to individualize the instructional program. Participants with different skill levels are welcome, however, basic skills in () are recommended.  Participants may let instructors know ahead of time what their special interests are.

    Tim Phelps, with a BFA from Wittenberg University and MS from the University of Michigan, is currently Professor, Medical Illustrator, and Director of Production teaching and illustrating for 36 years in the Department of Art as Applied to Medicine at Johns Hopkins in Baltimore, Maryland. He has received over 40 regional and national awards for his artwork published in textbooks, magazines, and professional journals. Projects have included multiple surgical texts and atlases on Otolaryngology, Orthopedics, Surgical Pathology, and Cardiac Surgery. Tim is a Past President and Past Chair of the Board of the Association of Medical Illustrators. He received the Max Broedel Award for Excellence in Education from Association of Medical Illustrators in 2015. Visit his website phelpsmandala.com for his current color and pen and ink nature artwork celebrating biodiversity and encouraging conservancy. Nature Mandala Portfolio https://www.facebook.com/PhelpsNatureMandalas/

    Suggested Materials List:

    • Strathmore papers:
    • Bristol Smooth Pad 9 x 12 in
    • Sketch paper pad 9 x 12 in
    • Drawing Pad 8 x 10 in
    • Optional Tracing paper pad 9 x 12 in
    • Canson Sketchbook for Journaling 5.5 x 8 in  (spiral bound)
    • Stadtler Graphite Pencils 2B HB 1H 2H
    • Pencil sharpener—your choice
    • Stadtler Plastic Eraser
    • Micron Pens (Fine Line) (005/ 02/ 08). Pack of 3 or individually
    • Small Plastic Ruler 12 in.
    • NOTE: Student may bring other art supplies if they wish to discuss with instructor for use in the class.

    Course is limited to maximize personalized instruction. Classes run for 5 consecutive Saturdays from 8am-10:30AM beginning on September 10 and ending on October 8.

    NHSM reserves the right to apply and/or change any and all COVID related policies based on the public health landscape at the time of the course. We appreciate your understanding.

    Cancellations not accepted within a week of the course date. If cancelled more than a week, refunds minus $10 processing fee will be made.

    • 11 Sep 2022
    • 8:30 AM - 3:00 PM
    • Stratford Cliffs / Stratford Hall Plantation 483 Great House Road, Montross, VA 22520 · Montross, VA
    • 5
    Register

    Photo credit: Virginia State Parks | CC

    The September Stratford Cliffs event is open NHSM Members!  

    Other Stratford events (August and October) will be open to non-members.

    Please check out those if you would like to join us. 

     

    We are returning to Stratford Cliffs for some fossil searching and hope you can join us!

    Stratford Cliffs, located in Montross, Virginia (on the south side of the Potomac River, adjacent to Westmoreland State Park) is part of the Stratford Hall plantation owned by four generations of the Lee family (and is now cared for by the Robert E. Lee Memorial Foundation).

    The estate encompasses 1900 acres of farmlands and forests on a high bluff overlooking the Potomac River. The Cliffs, which are part of the Calvert Formation, are a rare geological phenomenon. The Calvert Formation cliffs along the Chesapeake Bay and Potomac River rank among the most important fossil research sites in the Mid-Atlantic region. They were formed when land replaced an ancient sea. Fossils found here are composed of compacted marine plant and animal matter dating from the Miocene Epoch–approximately 17 to 10 million years ago.  

    Fossilized remains found at this site indicate a sea filled with primitive shark-toothed porpoises, salt-water crocodiles, sea cows, gopher turtles, rays, whales and sharks. Thousands of shark teeth found along this area attest to the frequency of the sharks, largest among them being Carcharodon megalodon, or Giant White Shark, with teeth measuring 7 inches or more.

    Most of the land along the shoreline is privately owned, and public access is severely limited, so we are lucky to have this opportunity!

    The driving time from Baltimore is an estimated 3 hours.

    Difficulty: This field trip is moderately strenuous (derived from the combination of the colder weather by the water and decent hiking). Depending on what storms have impacted the river, there could be washed up trees and debris on the beach, as well as broken glass. There could be a few scramble spots.

    Additional information will be provided to attendees closer to the trip date.

    Cancelation Policy: NHSM Field Experiences

    Cancelations made 7 or more days in advance of the field experience, will receive a refund (minus a $5 processing fee). Cancelations made within the week of the event will not receive a refund but can be transferred to a friend.

    • 11 Sep 2022
    • 12:00 PM - 4:00 PM
    • 6908 Bel Air Rd, Natural History Society of MD
    Register

    Nature Connections help you and yours explore and connect with nature.

    RSVP for this Out of This World Experience. We are super lucky to have representatives from the  Space Telescope Science Institute on hand for presentations and hands on activities including the James Webb Virtual Reality Experience (recommended for ages 10 and up). Don a VR headset then head out into space in the fully immersive WebbVR experience. You can visit the James Webb Space Telescope at its orbit point beyond the Moon, 1 million miles from Earth, set against an accurate backdrop of the Solar System. Fly up-close to Webb’s beautiful golden mirrors, and look out from its perspective on the universe. You can also compare Webb with the Hubble and WFIRST space telescopes. Info hubs within the VR environment provide more information about each mission.  Further out, explore your own cosmic neighborhood—the Solar System—in gorgeous detail. Fly through Saturn’s rings or join Jupiter’s moons in orbit around the gas giant. You may also leave the Solar System behind and visit the stunning Orion Nebula, where a swirling disk of gas and dust is beginning to form planets, or fly through the star fields of a simulated galaxy.

    Our guest speaker (TBD) will present on the JWST beginning at 1:30PM.

    The program is free, but for planning purposes, we ask that you RSVP.

    ABOUT NATURE CONNECTIONS: Nature Connections is a signature program offered to you by the Natural History Society of Maryland with financial support from Constellation Energy. Programs are held on select Sundays are free* and open to the public (COVID rules in effect – see below). Each Nature Connection focuses on a different natural history topic.

    • Learn from presentations and displays from local experts and organizations • Explore specimens and artifacts from natural history collections • Hear about related citizen science projects • Talk to scientists who can answer your questions and guide your discoveries of the natural world • Enjoy games, art, crafts, stories, music, and drama for all ages

    COVID PROTOCOLS: Masks are now optional. NHSM will continue to monitor the public health landscape and may make changes in accordance with CDC, state and local guidance.

    • 14 Sep 2022
    • 7:00 PM - 8:00 PM
    • Natural History Society of MD, Online via Zoom
    Register

    All alligators are crocodilians, but not all crocodilians are alligators!

    The order Crocodilia includes the true crocodiles (family Crocodylidae), the alligators and caimans (family Alligatoridae), and the gharial and false gharial (family Gavialidae). They first appeared 95 million years ago in the Late Cretaceous period (Cenomanian stage) and are the closest living relatives of birds, as the two groups are the only known survivors of the Archosauria.

    Want to learn more? Join us for the September meeting of the NHSM Herp Club, and see an alligator and crocodile live and in-person. Can’t make it to the museum? Tune in online. Due to the unique nature of the program, spaces are limited. In addition, to help cover the presentation, we are asking for a donation. 

    Since 1970, Michael Shwedick has introduced America to the fascinating world of reptiles. One of America’s leading reptile wildlife educators, Michael’s program has educated and entertained more than 15,000 audiences from Miami to Boston. More than 100,000 people a year experience Reptile World. Featured in magazines like National Geographic WORLD and in hundreds of newspaper articles throughout the country, Michael instills marvelous respect for both reptiles and his audiences.

    More info on Michael and Reptile World: https://reptileworld.org/educational-programs/

    Are you fascinated with reptiles and amphibians? The Natural History Society of Maryland’s Herp Club promotes the proper husbandry, conservation, study, and appreciation of reptiles and amphibians. Meet fellow “Herpers”! Amateurs, professionals, and kids of all ages are welcome! Membership to NHSM required. (NHSM membership is $25 for individuals, $35 for families.) Herp Club membership is an additional $5 for individuals and $10 for families annually. https://www.marylandnature.org/club-membership/
    Learn more about NHSM Clubs: https://youtu.be/pIA7naRjXws

    • 19 Sep 2022
    • 9:45 AM - 12:45 PM
    • Hart Miller Island
    • 0
    Registration is closed

    Hart-Miller Island is naturalists playground and an ecological success story. Join us on a guided tour conducted by the Maryland Environmental Services.

    We will meet the crew boat the land base location in Essex.  It’s about a 15 minute boat ride to the island where we take a driving (bus) tour of the facilities and discuss the history and construction of the island, the importance of the Port of Baltimore, and the need for dredging.  A full tour takes about 2 to 3 hours (including boat transportation). We will have lunch on the island – bring your own. Trip runs rain or shine.

    Hart-Miller Island is a 1,100-acre island located in Baltimore County on the Chesapeake Bay near the mouth of Middle River and is a must see for those who want to get away from it all. The island was originally part of a peninsula that extended from Edgemere, Maryland. The two islands, Hart and Miller, were joined by the construction of a dike in 1981, and until 2009, the impoundment was filled with dredge material from Baltimore Harbor, eventually creating Hart-Miller island. In recent years, Hart-Miller Island has become a haven for boaters in the northern Chesapeake Bay, providing the public opportunities to encounter many different species of plants, insects and wildlife along with other fun recreational activities.

    The western shore of the island offers safe mooring, wading and access to a 3,000-foot sandy beach. Hart-Miller Island State Park also includes Hawk Cove and Pleasure Island, which also provide recreational opportunities and camping. The park is well-known for its abundant migrating bird populations.

    Cancelation Policy: NHSM Field Experiences

    Cancelations made 7 or more days in advance of the field experience, will receive a refund (minus a $5 processing fee). Cancelations made within the week of the event will not receive a refund but can be transferred to a friend.

    COVID-19 Policy: The wearing of masks in state facilities is voluntary, but unvaccinated individuals are highly encouraged to wear a mask. If you are
    experiencing any symptoms such as a cough, fever, loss of taste or smell, or shortness of breath, please stay home.

    • 24 Sep 2022
    • 01 Oct 2022
    • 2 sessions
    • Cromwell Valley Park, Natural History Society of MD
    • 20
    Register

    Birds are important because they keep systems in balance: they pollinate plants, disperse seeds, scavenge carcasses and recycle nutrients back into the earth. But they also feed our spirits, marking for us the passage of the seasons, moving us to create art and poetry, inspiring us to flight and reminding us that we are not only on, but of, this earth.Melanie Driscoll, Director of bird conservation for the Gulf of Mexico and the Mississippi Flyway

    Bird Study was one of the first merit badges created in 1911, because a true outdoorsman can tell a lot about what’s happening outdoors by observing birds. This class will be conducted in four parts.

    • In-Person 90 minute classroom session at the Natural History Society of Maryland (September 24 from 3-4:30PM)
    • In-person 3 hour field expedition at Cromwell Valley Park (October 1 from 8:30-11:30AM)
    • On their own Scout requirements.
    • One on one Quiz with the Merit Badge Counselor done on Zoom or at the Cockeysville library, both with parents attending.

    Information about requirements for this badge:

    1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6,will be taught during the class.
    5, their list of 20 birds, I would like them to go out in the field by themselves or with other Scouts and parents and identify birds on their own.
    7we will do as part of our Cromwell Valley field trip.
    For7 A. 1. I would like Scouts to use the eBird listing app on their phone.  We can also show them how to use eBird and encourage them to open an account.  I will also show them how to use field guides and Merlin to identify birds by sound as well as sight.  Do you have a color printer?  We could give them the attached bird card for recording birds seen.  I have them use a highlighter and highlight the names of each bird.
    prerequisites:
    8 or it can be done after first class

    Instructor Bio –

    A certified Merit Badge Counselor and former Troop Leader, Marty Brazeau, Baltimore Bird Club member (BBC), is a retired Baltimore County School Librarian and is currently an Academic Advisor at the Community College of Baltimore County. Marty has birded in the Baltimore area since childhood and has served as the BBC Youth Birding Leader and the Junior Naturalist Coordinator at Oregon Ridge Park. He has completed a masters degree in Outdoor Education. Marty has visited Costa Rica nine times to film birds. Marty also developed the Ernest Thompson Seton Scout Naturalist  Program. Read about it in Scout’s Life https://scoutlife.org/about-scouts/scouting-around/175370/when-you-complete-the-seton-scout-naturalist-program-your-adventure-is-only-beginning/

    Things to remember to bring for this Merit Badge Class:

    1. Merit Badge Blue Card properly filled out and signed off by your Scoutmaster
    2. Bird Study Merit Badge Pamphlet – Read ahead of time to be most prepared.
    3. Scout Uniform
    4. Weather appropriate clothing for the time of year and location of the class for outdoor participation
    5. Supporting documentation or project work pertinent to this merit badge which may also include a Merit Badge Workbook for reference with notes
    6. A positive Scouting focus and attitude

    The Natural History Society of Maryland is a volunteer-led non-profit organization, so the fee you pay will go directly to support the programs, the nature collections, and the building that make this kind of nature education possible.

    Thank you for your support!

    Photo: Red-winged Blackbird by Mark R Johnson / Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology (ML93848971)

    • 27 Sep 2022
    • 02 Oct 2022
    • 3 sessions
    • 6908 Bel Air Rd, Natural History Society of MD, Online via Zoom
    • 17
    Register

    Those dragonflies and mayflies soaring through the air over a stream, got their start in a stream as an aquatic macroinvertebrate, small aquatic animals and the aquatic larval stages of insects. They include dragonfly and stonefly larvae, snails, worms, and beetles. Often found attached to rocks, vegetation, logs and sticks or burrowed into the bottom sand and sediments, macroinvertebrates play important roles in stream ecology as nutrient cyclers and as food for upper levels of the food chain. They are also used by scientists to assess water quality. As a plus, they are just really cool.

    In this 3-Part Workshop, led by stream ecologist, Ken Belt, you will learn about the life history of aquatic insects, role of these insects in freshwater aquatic ecosystems, and insect structure, morphology and adaptations. How the presence or absence of various species are indicators of water quality will also be covered. By the end of the workshop, you should be familiar with the common macroinvertebrate orders at a glance and have the taxonomic tools at your fingertips to identify whatever you may encounter including macroinvertebrates.org, an online identification tool for Common Freshwater Macroinvertebrates of Eastern North America.

    (Tuesday – September 27) DAY 1 – Online via Zoom – 7pm-9pm

    (Saturday – October 1) DAY 2 – In the Field – exploring streams – 11-3pm

    (Sunday – October 2) DAY 3 – In the classroom using microscopy for ID – 12pm-4pm

    Dr. Ken Belt has studied urban streams and their ecology in Baltimore for 40 years. He has worked for Baltimore City Department of Public Works, the USDA Forest Service, and the Baltimore Ecosystem Study, and now teaches at the department of Geography and Environmental Science at UMBC. His perspective has been holistic, with an eye for both the engineering of the urban landscape and the connections to aquatic ecosystems. He is also a new curator for NHSM where he is starting an aquatic insect collection and planning various identification training and education venues. Ken’s research interests focus on the interactions between stream biogeochemistry and ecological structure and function, and how these are affected by the mosaic of forests and engineered infrastructure on and within urban landscapes. Currently he is encouraging the use of ecohydrological principles in the designing of stormwater management networks, in particular those using a Nature Based Solutions (NBS) approach.
    Cancellations more than 7 days prior to the class will incur a $10 processing fee. Cancellations not accepted within a week of the course.
    • 28 Sep 2022
    • 7:00 PM - 8:00 PM
    • Natural History Society of MD, Online via Zoom
    Register

    Owing to the overwhelming evidence that some nonnative species can wreak havoc on native ecosystems, it’s not surprising that conservationists often follow an inflexible dichotomy: native equals good and nonnative equals bad. However, there are other theories and opinions that argue some nonnatives provide beneficial ecological functions that should not be ignored especially in our human altered natural world.
    Donna Thompson in Harford County counts herself among this group. She is on a mission to help the monarchs. Starting with the traditional suite of host plants, Donna’s efforts were yielding minimal results. However, when she planted the milkweed native to New Zealand, which is an annual species in Maryland, the monarchs couldn’t get enough.
    Let’s not forget that the honeybee is not native to North America, or black-eyed Susans native to Maryland, though they are the state flower.
    In a paper published in Conservation Biology, Scientists argue for recognizing the ecological value of some introduced species. “We predict the proportion of non-native species that are viewed as benign or even desirable will slowly increase over time,” they write. They stress that they are  not calling for every introduced species to be protected, or even tolerated. Instead, they hope the conservation community will at least consider the possibility that introduced species can do some good.
    Many people disagree.
    And that is OK. So let’s discuss, and learn more. See the excerpt from an article in Nature below.
    NOTE: Donna is aware that there are studies suggesting that the tropical milkweed with “harbors OE spores.”  This is from Florida where the plants live through the winter. In northern states, these plants are annuals.  They die off over the winter and we start fresh in the spring. The other theory is Monarchs delaying migration because the plants are so healthy it encourages the monarchs to hang around.  The answer is to simply pull the plants out in September so they will be on their way.
    NHSM is not taking a position one way or the other – only providing information.

    Non-natives can be beneficial by, for example, providing habitat for endangered native species (Schlaepfer et al. 2010). One commentator has argued, “It’s hard to imagine a New England roadside without its tawny day lilies and Queen Anne’s lace, yet both these species are aliens marked for elimination. . . Could it be these plants have actually improved the New England landscape, adding to its diversity and beauty?” (Pollan 1994). We should also note the vast benefits to humans of the imported, non-native species used in agriculture. Moreover, identifying non-natives with damaging invasives ignores that native species can also be damaging and invasive. For example, the native Mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) “is currently suspected to be killing more trees than any other [insect] in North America” (Davis et al. 2011). While it is true that we know what to expect with native species in their native habitat and do not know what to expect with alien species in new habitats (Gould 1997), the equation of non-native species with damaging invaders is overly simplistic.I suggest we understand native species as species that have significantly adapted in response to resident species and the local abiotic environment. By adapted I do not mean “positively fit in” — aggressively competing is as much adapting as is establishing symbiotic relationships. Natives will have forged ecological links with other natives (via predation, commensalism, and other forms of interaction) and perhaps responded evolutionarily as well.
    NOTE: This meeting will be hybrid meaning you may attend in person at the museum or tune in online via Zoom. Please select your preference when checking out.
    All are welcome. If you love butterflies and moths, consider joining the Lep Club.  The Lep Club, is made up of novice and expert lepidopterists who meet to exchange knowledge and support concerning habitat, threats, food sources, identification, and life cycle of butterflies and moths. Club meetings encourage a sharing of knowledge for the raising and breeding of moths and butterflies through hands-on lessons and guest speakers. Club members are also involved in outreach in the greater Baltimore community through educational programs and service projects. Club meetings feature a guest speaker that share their knowledge on a topic related to moths and butterflies as well as time to distribute caterpillars and eggs.
    To learn more about all NHSM Clubs: https://youtu.be/pIA7naRjXws
    To become a member: https://www.marylandnature.org/club-membership/
    • 29 Sep 2022
    • 7:00 PM - 8:00 PM
    • Online via Zoom
    Register

    The Maryland Ornithological Society owns ten sanctuaries, totaling about 3,000 acres, spanning the
    state from Garrett County in the west, to Somerset County on the lower Eastern Shore. All of the
    sanctuaries are open to the public every day of the year, at no charge, and represent a microcosm of the
    habitats for birds and other wildlife in Maryland. Two of the sanctuaries, Carey Run and Irish Grove,
    offer overnight lodging in their historic, rustic homes. Many of the other sanctuaries are seldom visited.
    Drawing on the files of the MOS Sanctuary Committee, historic accounts in Maryland Birdlife, and
    photos and materials provided by MOS members from across the state, Marcia will provide profiles of
    the sanctuaries, discuss their birds and habitats, and show maps and photos. Because MOS would
    welcome assistance from naturalists in documenting the flora and fauna at the sites, Marcia will
    conclude with suggestions on how interested individuals can become involved with the sanctuaries.

    About the Presenter ; Marcia Watson is a long-time member of the Maryland Ornithological Society. As a member of the MOS Sanctuary Committee, Marcia is working to foster awareness of the sanctuaries among MOS members and the broader public. Interested in biology and the outdoors from the time she was a little girl, Marcia holds a doctoral degree in Biological Sciences from the University of Delaware, and for over 20 years specialized in research dealing with the environmental signals that animals use to coordinate their lifecycles with seasonal changes such as daylength and temperature. She then moved on to become an academic administrator at University of Delaware and, later, University of Maryland University College. Marcia is now retired and lives with her husband Gene Scarpulla in Bowie, MD. She serves as President and webmaster of the Patuxent Bird Club.

    • 15 Oct 2022
    • 16 Oct 2022
    • 2 sessions
    • 6908 Bel Air Rd, Natural History Society of MD
    • 8
    Register

    From 8-meter mushrooms to zombie ants, we will explore the mysteries of the kingdom Fungi and their importance to us all.

    Taught by mycologist, Serenella Linares, during this course, we will learn about the natural history of these fascinating creatures, their ecological roles, their ever changing taxonomy, how these organisms intersect with different environments, and how crucial fungi are in human lives. This program is a 2 part series, with a lecture portion via zoom followed by an in-person day of discovery and forest exploration to see and identify the organisms in their natural habitat.

    • INSTRUCTION – Saturday, October 15
    • FIELD STUDY – Sunday, October 16

    NOTE: As of publishing, this course is designed to be taught in person at the Natural History Society of Maryland. NHSM will continue to monitor the ever-changing public health environment, and reserves the right to impose public safety measures including moving the course to online if deemed necessary.

    Instructor’s Bio – Serenella Linares serves as Director of Adult Education at Audubon Naturalist Society (ANS) and Co-Chair of Naturally Latinos. Through the Naturalist Hour, Natural History Field Studies, and Master Naturalist programs, Serenella utilizes the virtual world as an introductory door into the fascinating aspects of nature and a catalyst for people to get inspired to learn more in person.

    Prior to joining ANS, Ms. Linares worked as an assistant park naturalist with the Prince George’s County Department of Parks and Recreation from 2011-2016 at an urban nature center serving predominantly African-American and Hispanic communities. She holds a Bachelor’s degree in biology from Universidad Metropolitana de Puerto Rico, a Master’s degree in atmospheric science from Howard University, and graduate training in mycology from University of Maryland. When Ms. Linares is not teaching, she explores natural areas, photographs practices nature photography, and participates in citizen science projects.

    • 23 Oct 2022
    • 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM
    • 6908 Bel Air Rd, Natural History Society of MD
    • 1
    Register

    Vines, leaves, and vegetables provide the basis for creating wonderful, evocative prints on fabric. This class features the use of colorful Versatex water-based printmaking ink, experimenting on cotton or cotton-blend fabrics.  You will get the opportunity to hand print as well as use a portable walking press –  so wear or bring a pair of favorite socks!  Bring flat leaves, large and small,  more will be provided.

    You’ll learn the process and practice on muslin. After that, you can print on your own silk or cotton shirts, scarves or tote bags. The Versatex ink can be heat-set with an iron and washed, so the technique can be applied to other fabrics including linen and batik prints to make clothing, table runners, or fabric for quilts. If you would like a link to order your own good quality black cotton aprons (as in the image) or silk scarves, please email Sue at sue.fierston@gmail.com.

    PERFECT FOR HOLIDAY GIFTS,,,,

    TERMS and CONDITIONS: This is an adult only class. Because materials are prepared for each participant, cancellations with refund minus the cost of the materials ($15) will be applied if cancelled outside of 7 days of the course. Cancellations not accepted within a week of the course date.     Masks will be required. Food and drink inside the facility is prohibited. 

    INSTRUCTOR: Sue Fireston is a printmaker and current president of the international Nature Printing Society. Who creates nature prints by hand and on a walking press using actual leaves and fish.   Sue spends about half her time giving workshops connecting people with nature and showing them how easy it is to celebrate the natural world.  She holds nature printmaking workshops in the spring and fall at the Smithsonian Associates and now for the Natural History Society of Maryland. Her prints and paintings can be seen on my website: suefierston.com and on Instagram at: @suefierston_leaves_three_ways.

    In June 2020, Swinging Bridge Press published Sue Firestone’s book Into the Woods: Families Making Art With Nature. 

     

    • 29 Oct 2022
    • 10:00 AM - 3:00 PM
    • 6908 Bel Air Rd, Natural History Society of MD
    • 9
    Register

    This workshop will introduce participants to lichen biology, ecology, and diversity.  We will start the workshop in the classroom with an introduction to lichens and a discussion of some of the ways and places that lichens grow. Then we will go on a short walk with an introduction to some of the common lichens of Maryland and a demonstration of how to collect, label, and store specimens. Then we will spend the next 2 hours in the lab, viewing the features of the lichens we’ve collected under the microscopes and using keys to identify them. Participants will also have the option to bring their own specimens to identify. Participants should bring walking shoes and outdoor clothes appropriate to the weather as this event will take place rain or shine. We will provide hand lenses for participants to observe the lichens in the field (but we encourage you to bring your own if you have one!) and microscopes will be available in the lab.

    Natalie Howe has been studying lichens with high or low intensity for the past 14 years, and currently lives in Washington DC.  She is a Biological Scientist at the U.S.D.A., and an adjunct teacher of Mushrooms, Molds, and Society class at George Mason University. In the pre-covid times, she was volunteering with the lichen team at Patuxent Research Refuge in MD, Rock Creek Park in DC and at Liberty State Park in NJ to document the lichens there. For her dissertation research at Rutgers University in New Jersey, she studied the ecology of lichens in the NJ Pinelands.

    Recommended text: Urban Lichens: A Field Guide for Northeastern North America Paperback – November 23, 2021 – by Jessica L Allen (Author), James C Lendemer (Author), Jordan R Hoffman (Illustrator). Purchase is optional. Copies will be available during the class for reference. 

    NHSM reserves the right to apply and/or change any and all COVID related policies based on the public health landscape at the time of the course. We appreciate your understanding.

    • 04 Nov 2022
    • 5:00 PM - 8:00 PM
    • 6908 Bel Air Rd, Natural History Society of MD
    Register

    Before the doors open to the general public, NHSM Members will get first dibs on the great selection of books. Each year, the Natural History Society of Maryland hosts a big book sale. Proceeds support on-going educational programming. There are tons of great books at garage sale prices including: Field Guides – Nature – Plants – Outdoor Activities – Wildlife – Photography – Archaeology – Fossils – Children’s – Gardening – Textbooks – Periodicals – Historic Pamphlets – Memoirs – Travel Guides – and more…

    If you aren’t a member, it is easy to become one. Memberships start at $25 and are tax deductible.

    General Public Sale – Can’t make it on Friday night, come out to the General Public Day on November 5  to Feed your curiosity with new books.

    Fill your house with stacks of books, in all the crannies and all the nooks. Dr. Seuss

    • 05 Nov 2022
    • 10:00 AM - 1:00 PM
    • 6908 Bel Air Rd, Natural History Society of MD
    Register

    Come one, Come All. Saturday to Feed your curiosity with new books.

    The Natural History Society of Maryland is hosting a book sale. Proceeds support on-going educational programming. Great books at garage sale prices including previously loved: Field Guides – Nature – Plants – Outdoor Activities – Wildlife – Photography – Archaeology – Fossils – Children’s – Gardening – Textbooks – Periodicals – Historic Pamphlets – Memoirs – Travel Guides – and more…

    NOTE: Members Only Night is the night before, November 4 – Before the doors open to the general public, NHSM Members will get first dibs on the great selection of books. If you aren’t a member, it is easy to become one. Memberships start at $25 and are tax deductible.

    Fill your house with stacks of books, in all the crannies and all the nooks. Dr. Seuss

    • 19 Nov 2022
    • 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
    • Will be given to participants the day before.
    • 25
    Register

    Beavers are considered “ecosystem engineers,” recognized for their ability to construct dams and create ponds. And while some might consider beavers to be pests, they can actually help us manage water-related issues such as drought, flooding, and water pollution. On this walk, Bill will  show how to read the signs of beaver activity, but he will also talk about the important role that beavers had in creating the American landscape as we enjoy it today, and how other species (including us humans!) depend on their work.  We’ll also see a flow device–a great tool to facilitate human-beaver coexistence. All ages are welcome to join us and we really encourage our young naturalists to join us! There’s lots of exploring to do.

    • Difficulty: Easy-moderate. Most of the trail is level. We will walk on grass for the most part. The route is not wheelchair accessible. Easy for kids. Total walking distance will be about 0.5 miles
    • What to wear: Dress in warm layers, and don’t forget to wear gloves, mittens, hats, scarves, etc. And don’t forget good walking shoes/boots.
    • What to bring: Water, and a good sense of humor!
    • Location: Harford County – location will be provided upon registration.

    Who’s Bill? – Bill Curtis is a National Park Ranger currently stationed at Hampton National Historic Site and Fort McHenry National Monument and Historic Shrine. While a history major at Gettysburg College he began his career as a Licensed Battlefield Guide.  His NPS career has included full time duty as an interpreter, law enforcement officer, and he now works in the Project Management Division.  He is a Maryland Master Naturalist. He is happily married and the proud father of two.

    RAIN date – November 26

    Cancelation Policy: NHSM Field Experiences
    Cancelations made 7 or more days in advance of the field experience, will receive a refund (minus a $5 processing fee). Cancelations made within the week of the event will not receive a refund but can be transferred to a friend.

Past events

15 Aug 2022 Escape to Hart-Miller Island: Educational Tour #1
13 Aug 2022 Fossil Hunting at Stratford Cliffs (August)
06 Aug 2022 Grasses, Sedges and Rushes Identification
03 Aug 2022 A fish-eat-fish world: Dunkleosteus and other creatures from the Cleveland Shale
28 Jul 2022 Fish Out of Water: Terrestrial Locomotion of Amphibious Fish
25 Jul 2022 RESCHEDULED: Escape to Hart-Miller Island -Educational Tour
24 Jul 2022 Art and Nature: Make a Comb Basket
23 Jul 2022 Quaker Neck Landing Paddle
22 Jul 2022 Moth Night: Sweet Air Area part 2
17 Jul 2022 Fossil Hunting at Stratford Cliffs (July-NHSM Members)
16 Jul 2022 Baltimore Heritage: Gargoyles, Landmarks, and Lions Downtown Baltimore Walking Tour
14 Jul 2022 Natural History of Shrews of the Mid-Atlantic Region of the US
13 Jul 2022 The Great Virgin Islands Frog Count: a low-tech, high-return method for finding frogs
09 Jul 2022 Moth Nights: Sweet Air Area
09 Jul 2022 Bromo Seltzer Tower Tour
01 Jul 2022 Moth Nights: Harford County MD
25 Jun 2022 SharkFest 2022
24 Jun 2022 Sharkfest Kick Off: Exploring the Hidden Lives of Sharks with Dr. Aaron Carlisle and David Shiffman
22 Jun 2022 Summer Species Swap and Husbandry Panel
19 Jun 2022 PG County Urban Stream Fossil Hunt (Fossil Club Members Only)
18 Jun 2022 Fossil Hunting at Stratford Cliffs (June)
17 Jun 2022 Moth Night in Monkton
16 Jun 2022 COVID in Animals -A Zoo Veterinarian's Perspective
15 Jun 2022 Overlooked Places: Telling the interconnected history of Maryland through recent archaeology in Baltimore
09 Jun 2022 The Marvelous Mysids of Maryland
08 Jun 2022 Timber Rattlesnakes
08 Jun 2022 Public Bird Banding Demonstration at the Museum (2 of 2)
04 Jun 2022 Baltimore Heritage: Federal Hill Walking Tour
04 Jun 2022 Insect Study Merit Badge Class
01 Jun 2022 FIN-tastic Fossil Sharks: A Hands-on fossil club meeting
22 May 2022 World Turtle Day 2022
21 May 2022 Banneker Spring BioBlitz
19 May 2022 Oceans, Atmospheres and Climates of Earth VS. Other Planets and Moons
18 May 2022 Octoraro - Susquehannock Fort or Pre-Contact Town, An Archaeological Mystery
17 May 2022 Darwin Remembers: Recollections of a Life's Journey
15 May 2022 Fossil Collecting from the Middle Devonian at Beltzville State Park, PA
14 May 2022 Gyotaku: The Art of the Japanese Fishprint Workshop: Art and Nature
14 May 2022 Gyotaku: The Art of the Japanese Fishprint Workshop: SESSION II
12 May 2022 The Beltsville Virtual Experience - 7,000 acres in one hour
11 May 2022 The Bog Turtle: Natural History and Conservation in Maryland
11 May 2022 Public Bird Banding Demonstration at the Museum
07 May 2022 Field Trip: Maryland Archaeological Conservation Lab (Archeology Club Only)
07 May 2022 Reptile and Amphibian Study Merit Badge Day
06 May 2022 Review Rally: City Nature Challenge
05 May 2022 Bobcats in Maryland - Distribution, Abundance, and Population Genetics
04 May 2022 Sharks: A Journey Through Deep Time
01 May 2022 Fossil Hunting at Stratford Cliffs (May-NHSM Members ONLY)
30 Apr 2022 Archaeology Expo 2022 - The Future of Studying the Past: Innovative Technologies in Maryland Archeology
28 Apr 2022 Community Bird Banding with Birds of Urban Baltimore (B.Ur.B)
27 Apr 2022 Monarch Sister Schools
24 Apr 2022 Teacher Training: Environmental History of Maryland Through Fossils
24 Apr 2022 Wild Edible Field Trip: Morels
23 Apr 2022 Magical Mandalas Workshop
20 Apr 2022 Star-Spangled Archaeology:  Examining the War of 1812 Through Maritime Archaeology
16 Apr 2022 From Forest Floor to the Treetops: An Introduction to Maryland Birds
16 Apr 2022 Fossil Hunting at Stratford Cliffs (April-Fossil Club Members ONLY)
15 Apr 2022 Vernal Pool Series: Gunpowder Trip April 15 (NHSM Members)
14 Apr 2022 I Spy with My Little Eye - An Introduction to City Nature Challenge 2022
13 Apr 2022